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How We Can Predict The Next Financial Crisis

In this interesting TED video we learn about the financial crisis and more data on how to predict it.

The 2007-2008 financial crisis, you might think, was an unpredictable one-time crash. But Didier Sornette and his Financial Crisis Observatory have plotted a set of early warning signs for unstable, growing systems, tracking the moment when any bubble is about to pop. (And he’s seeing it happen again, right now.)

The Key to Growth? Race With the Machines

This is an interesting video from Ted about the way increasing productivity further in the future.

As machines take on more jobs, many find themselves out of work or with raises indefinitely postponed. Is this the end of growth? No, says Erik Brynjolfsson — it’s simply the growing pains of a radically reorganized economy. A riveting case for why big innovations are ahead of us … if we think of computers as our teammates. Be sure to watch the opposing viewpoint from Robert Gordon.

How Much Money is There on Earth?

An interesting video about money from Vsauce.

The Inequality Crisis

This is an interesting video from RSA about inequality and economy.

Economist and author Stewart Lansley argues that the surging income gap of recent decades has not only been socially corrosive, but is also at the roots of our national and global economic crises.

The Thank You Economy

This is an interesting video about the humanization of economy in connection with social media with Gary Vaynerchuk from 2011.

Who controls the world?

This is an interesting video about finance, economy and our modern society in the context of the science of complexity.

James Glattfelder studies complexity: how an interconnected system — say, a swarm of birds — is more than the sum of its parts. And complexity theory, it turns out, can reveal a lot about how the economy works. Glattfelder shares a groundbreaking study of how control flows through the global economy, and how concentration of power in the hands of a shockingly small number leaves us all vulnerable. (Filmed at TEDxZurich.)

Everything You Need to Know About Finance and Investing

As a follow-up to my last post about an economics, we get more information about the finance and investment world.

We all want to be financially stable and enjoy a well-funded retirement, and we don’t want to throw out our hard-earned money on poor investments. But most of us don’t know the first thing about finance and investing. Acclaimed value investor William Ackman teaches you what it takes to finance and grow a successful business and how to make sound investments that will grant you to a cash-comfy retirement.

The Slow Revolution

In this fast, multitasking world we get an insight from RSA into “The Slow Revolution”.

The last ten years has seen a burgeoning of the Slow Movement in all aspects of life from management, travel and education to science and work.

The RSA brings together a group of thinkers and practitioners who have each been exploring ways to bring the principles of ‘slow’ to their life and work – whether in finance, culture or fashion. As well as sharing lessons from their own fields, they will discuss how more of us can deal with the addictive nature of speed, apply the brakes and improve our quality of life, creativity and well-being.

Monopolies as an Introduction to Economics

In this interesting 44 minutes video from “The Floating University” we see an introduction in the complicated science of economics.

In the study of economics, the big questions recapitulate the little ones. If you think about the cost of a chocolate chip cookie or how airline ticket pricing works and you do so rigorously with an inquisitive mind, you will soon enough gain insight into how the whole world really operates. From the basics of pricing, demand, and competition to global politics and the future of government, Professor Levmore makes it easy to see economics at work all around us.

More banks, fewer problems

Should we have more small banks, and not that much big ones? Is the question that Scott Shay is trying to answer in the next TED talk.

Scott Shay is a small banker with a big idea: No more big banks. The way he sees it, the bigger they are, the harder they fall and the bigger the global disaster they can leave in their wake. At TEDxWallStreet, he appeals for a massive break-up — spreading out the risk, diversifying the field, lowering the dependency and creating a more secure financial system overall.

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