Tag Archive | Programming

Watson, Jeopardy and Me, the Obsolete Know-it-all

This is a video about knowledge and computers.

Trivia whiz Ken Jennings has made a career as a keeper of facts; he holds the longest winning streak in history on the U.S. game show Jeopardy. But in 2011, he played a challenge match against supercomputer Watson — and lost. With humor and humility, Jennings tells us how it felt to have a computer literally beat him at his own game, and also makes the case for good old-fashioned human knowledge.

Are You a Good Programmer or Great Programmer?

This is an interesting video about the differences between a good and a great programmer and the route to take to get you there.

What’s the difference between a standard programmer and a programmer that drives a fancy car? Is it about the number of coding languages you know? Probably Not. What about your expensive degree? Maybe. Does it have to with your problem solving skills? Perhaps.

In this episode XDA Developer TV Producer Jayce interviews developers and people from the programming world to answer these questions. Interviews include Alan Paulin a Software Engineer from Google, Jorge Castro a Software Engineer from Ubuntu, MIshkin Berteig the President of Berteig Consulting Inc, David Janzen Associate Professor at Cal Poly, and Chris Haseman an Android Engineer from Tumblr.

What most schools don’t teach

This video is about “coding”.

“Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer … because it teaches you how to think” – Steve Jobs

Learn about a new “superpower” that isn’t being taught in 90% of US schools.
Starring Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, will.i.am, Chris Bosh, Jack Dorsey, Tony Hsieh, Drew Houston, Gabe Newell, Ruchi Sanghvi, Elena Silenok, Vanessa Hurst, and Hadi Partovi. Directed by Lesley Chilcott.

The Art of Creative Coding

Here is a video about some things that don’t intersect each other that often : art and programming .

Programming plays a huge role in the world that surrounds us, and though its uses are often purely functional, there is a growing community of artists who use the language of code as their medium. To simplify the coding process, several platforms and libraries have been assembled to allow coders to cut through the nitty-gritty of programming and focus on the creative aspects of the project. These platforms all share a strong open source philosophy that encourages growth and experimentation, creating a rich community of artists that share their strategies and work with unprecedented openness.

Massimo Banzi: How Arduino is open-sourcing imagination

Here is a great video from TED about the open-source micro controller board named Arduino.

This is how wikipedia defines Arduino:

Arduino is a popular open-sourcesingle-board microcontroller, descendant of the open-source Wiring platform,[2][3] designed to make the process of using electronics in multidisciplinary projects more accessible. The hardware consists of a simple open hardware design for the Arduino board with an Atmel AVR processor and on-board input/output support. The software consists of a standard programming language compiler and the boot loader that runs on the board.[4]

Arduino hardware is programmed using a Wiring-based language (syntax and libraries), similar to C++ with some slight simplifications and modifications, and a Processing-based integrated development environment.

Current versions can be purchased pre-assembled; hardware design information is available for those who would like to assemble an Arduino by hand. Additionally, variations of the Italian-made Arduino—with varying levels of compatibility—have been released by third parties; some of them are programmed using the Arduino software.

More information about the video from TED :

Massimo Banzi helped invent the Arduino, a tiny, easy-to-use open-source micro controller that’s inspired thousands of people around the world to make the coolest things they can imagine — from toys to satellite gear. Because, as he says, “You don’t need anyone’s permission to make something great.”